Reviews Cisco-Linksys Wireless-B Music System WMLS11B

Cisco-Linksys Wireless-B Music System WMLS11B

Product Description

The Linksys Wireless-B Music System lets you bring the digital music stored on your computer to your Home Entertainment Center, without running cables through the house. Using a wireless connection, the Music System finally frees your digital music collection from those little computer speakers to play in full glory through your stereo system.|||The Wireless-B Music System sits by your home stereo and connects to it using standard consumer electronics cables. Then it connects to your home network by Wireless-B (802.11b) wireless networking, or if you prefer, it can be connected via standard 10/100 Ethernet cabling. Using the included remote control and the built-in LCD menus, you can browse your MP3 or WMA formatted music collection on your home PCs by title, artist, album, genre, or playlist.

From the Manufacturer

The Linksys Wireless-B Music System lets you bring the digital music stored on your computer to your Home Entertainment Center, without running cables through the house. Using a wireless connection, the Music System finally frees your digital music collection from those little computer speakers to play in full glory through your stereo system.

The Wireless-B Music System sits by your home stereo and connects to it using standard consumer electronics cables. Then it connects to your home network by Wireless-B (802.11b) wireless networking, or if you prefer, it can be connected via standard 10/100 Ethernet cabling. Using the included remote control and the built-in LCD menus, you can browse your MP3 or WMA formatted music collection on your home PCs by title, artist, album, genre, or playlist. Or, access the Rhapsody Digital Music service (free trial included) to listen to over 450,000 songs on demand, create custom playlists and radio stations, and burn mixed CDs on your PC. You can also tune into thousands of Internet radio stations from over 100 different countries around the world.

Choose the music you want, and let the Wireless-B Music System play it through your living room stereo. Or, with its small but powerful detachable speakers, it can also act as your portable digital music "boombox". Carry the Music System around the house and have access to your entire music collection, and your favorite Internet radio stations, anywhere within range of your wireless network -- the kitchen, den, even out on the patio by the pool.

Let the Linksys Wireless-B Music System bring digital music out into the living room for the whole family to enjoy.


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Comments:
Radio reception is horrible in our condo. So, I've been searching for some sort of appliance that could play internet radio programs. Up until about a week ago, none apparently existed. A few days ago, I discovered the LinkSys Wireless Internet Radio at Amazon.
There is a unit that, for want of a better name is an Internet radio tuner and two detachable powered speakers. The tuner can be hooked up to a stereo using standard RCA plugs or an optical connection. The tuner connects wirelessly (11Mbps) to the Internet through a standard wireless Access Point. It uses the same Internet connection you normally use.
You can access Internet programs using the unit's front panel LCD and buttons or you can use the unit's remote control. There are 1200 stations and the list is updated regularly. You can set up a list of 20 favorite stations. I've got such stations as KPFA and WBAI (Pacifica San Francisco and New York), KUSC, KCSN and a bunch of college stations set up.
The tuner also uses a new technology called Universal Plug-and-Play Server. This makes it possible for on-line services to provide access to program material on the Internet and for you to play it on your Internet radio appliance. I am using the Rhapsody service. It's music oriented with 60 pre-set music stations (I'm listening to the Baroque station right now) and you can even create your own by setting up a list of artists. Tracks are served up randomly. The service claims to have hundreds of thousands of albums.
There are only two current drawbacks.
First, the unit currently natively plays only streaming MP3 Internet radio stations. That's still a lot, but it doesn't allow for stations that use proprietary formats like Real Player or Microsoft Media Player. Universal Plug-and-Play Server services can get around that by converting streams to MP3. Since Real Player operates Rhapsody, I hope they soon convert at least Real Player streams to MP3.
The second drawback is that the unit isn't portable. Even though you can wireless receive the Internet signals that carry input anywhere in your home, you have to plug the unit into a 120 volt receptable. This could be fixed easily on the tuner by turning off the always-on front panel LCD and running both the tuner and speakers off of batteries. Internally recharged batteries would be ideal.

This will only get you a few internet radio stations out of the box.
It comes with MusicMatch Jukebox which is now the Yahoo Music Engine.
Both of which will not work on Vista. At least I have not een able to make it work on Vista and have worked very hard to try and get it to work.
I am not sure if MusicMatch will work on xp. I do know that the Twonky media server will work on xp,but have not gotten it to work in Vista.
Although the maker of Twonky says it does. Twonky is $30.00 U.S.
Also tried other media servers on both XP and Vista. JRivers Media Server and On2Share. Neither worked properly in Vista or XP.With twonky on XP I am able to serve my mp3's to my linkys and get a ton of internet radio stations too.

This product depends upon a media server application. The installation CD comes with MusicMatch Jukebox, which doesn't work anymore since MusicMatch is out of business. You can use other media servers (Microsoft Media Player, for instance), and it somewhat works. If the reason you bought this, however, is for internet radio, Media Player doesn't help. Your best bet is to go to [...], download their replacement firmware, and use their Super Internet Radio Tuning Service. It updates the station list on the device and let's you tune in to stations without having to use a separate computer to run a media server. You can still use something like Microsoft Media Player if you prefer to access music that resides on your computer.

In summary, (a) don't bother trying to get the out-of-the-box software to work, (b) use [...] (run by vTuner) to upgrade the firmware, (c) buy Super Internet Radio Tuning Service ($20-30) from vTuner if you want internet radio, (d) use Windows Media Player if you want to play stuff that's already on your computer.

You can find new units for $25-30 if you look around. If that's what you'll pay, it is worth having. On the other hand, if you have to pay $100 for the unit, I wouldn't recommend it.

Ok, if you buy this item be aware that its limited to mp3 audio delivery. Also, you must upgrade to the latest bios on the system otherwise is very limited.
To receive other radio station you need to purchase access to the radio software.
Also, you should join the yahoo group for this radio.

Outside that, the setup is easy (if you follow the instructions). Radio output is ok, it sound more boxy that anything else even if you change the output quality.

Its ok for this inexpensive radio.

12/19/2012 ===== This unit is still working fine and with the use of Tversity is streaming to my shed or garage depending were I use it.

If one takes the time to do a little research on this product and upgrade the firmware you would find this a great radio for the money. I bought 3 units and have them scattered around the house, hooked into my wireless network. I'm very happy with them, they do what I desired which is to listen to internet radio. No problems updating the firmware, no problems getting them onto my wireless network. I'm happy with the sound of the speakers, I have one unit hooked into my stereo system One day I'll probably buy one of those $300+ units out there but for now I have more internet radio stations that I need

I am surprised to find out that this product was discontinued a year or 2 ago. I guess that's why I got it for about 1/3 of the original price when it first came out.

Pros:
-The sound is clear and enjoyable via wireless connection.
-Wireless reception is strong enough so I can listen to music/radio upstairs even if the wireless access point is located downstairs at the other side of the house (about 40ft. away).
-Windows Media Player can be used as the media server to stream music to the unit.

Cons:
-It was a hassle to look for the updated firmware so it could work properly.
-With the speakers attached, the unit is rather big for a radio.
-If you look at the back, there are so many wires visible even though I tried to tidy up with cable ties.
-If you want to keep your personal radio stations selections, you need to pay $30 to join. But you actually don't need that "membership" to listen to hundreds of radio stations broadcasted on the Internet.

Even though there are some cons about this unit, I still highly recommend it to a friend.

About 18 month ago, I purchased my first wireless internet radio. media player. An Acoustic Energy. I spent over two years arguing over what to buy, was it worth so much money, etc. One of the first I looked at was this Linksys Wireless Music System but at the time it cost 150 dollars. While I was arguing with myself overpurchasing this system, Acoustic Energy came out with its first wireless radio using the Reciva database.
The AE was not my first system. I did have an earlier system, a "Sonowave" that used XML based software to transmit stations to a remote boom box by means of a separate USB tranceiver that was connected to the computer and transmitted on a 900MHZ frequency. It had wonderful stereo sound, but it died in six months and was only useful for FM after that.

The Reciva system is very good and it has gotten a lot of the wrinkles out of receiving streaming internet radio.

But the 30 dollar price of this unit makes it well worth anyones while to buy it, either as a second system or a first internet radio for anyone who does not wish to spend the 300 dollars that most wifi radios now cost

As an internet radio, it works more than well enough. It does not handle Real Audio streams, but most stations also run on either MP3 and Windows Media formats as well, so this is not a big sacrifice.

Many here have complained that some of the station that are programmmed into this music system do not play, but that is rather due to its reliance on the VTuner database. Reciva established its own database for its user, and Linksys relied on an existing product. Many of the vTuner stations are dead links. Users can send updates to urls to the Vtuner site as well as request that they add stations and they are rather good about doing this. But the fact that stations do not play is not a fault of the unit, but of the web site that runs the database of stations.

On the whole I would recommend this radio as an inexpensive introduction to internet radios, a second system to those who already own one.

I am not all that interested personally in streaming my music collection from my computer. My Reciva unit does that quite well, but it is something I actually never use.

The unit is very easy to set up by anyone who has ever set up their own wireless router/dsl modem combo or a wireless modem. It is a simple matter of simply connecting the radio to your computers ethernet port and running the set up software. Updating to the latest drivers and firmware is recommended, its easy to get them both off the Linksys site.

While people state that it only runs MP3 stations, I have been able to run radio stations that use Windows Media files as well. Again, there are many that are listed on the vTuner site that are not up to date and so do not run, but those that are up to date run on this unit fine, so far.

If the station runs off of the VTUNER site on your computer, it will run on this music player. You just have to look at the VTUNER site, try to run the station from there, and then try it on your Linksys Wireless Music System. The only VTuner stations that will not run on this one seem to by those using Real Player modes.

NJ
Buy it plug it use it.
I really like it and recommend.
Also check [...]
They will explain how to change WMLS into a space ship.

I originally bought the Logitech Wireless Music System for PC to stream the music from my computer to elsewhere in my house, but it didn't allow me to browse my music, so I bought the WMLS11B because it does allow browsing. It took me around an hour to research and get this thing fully set up, so be ready to take some time to get this thing running.

First off, DO NOT use the software that comes with this unit. You can find all the information you need about how to set up the unit, where to get the latest firmware, what music server software to use instead of the generic Linksys junk, etc. at the Yahoo group called WMLS11B ( [...] ). You'll have to join the group before you can browse it. First off, go to the "Files" section of the group and use the "Getting Started-New Installation Win XP.pdf" file to start the process. It should give you the information you need to set this up. Do the firmware upgrade first, then load some music server software. I personally used the Twonky Music Server (the file is "TwonkyMusicserverSetup2.9.1.exe"). It's easy to install and decently easy to use. It has lots of options and tweaks, so depending on how much time you want to spend on it, you can do lots of cool stuff. On the Twonky configuration screen, set the "contentdir" setting to the main directory where your mp3's are stored.

I personally had no problems at all setting this up with the existing wireless network in our house. It's not a protected connection because we don't live near anyone, so the encryption wasn't a problem. But I took this thing in the other room, and it worked great the first time! The internet radio stations are awesome to have! There are so many of them, and they are very diverse. And the unit easily found the music from my computer and played it very well (there may have been a couple slight disruptions, nothing horrible...95% of the songs played flawlessly).

As previously mentioned by another reviewer, the sound from the speakers is actually really nice. Great bass and sound, for the size of the speakers. But when I hooked it up to our full-sized amp/sound board/speakers, it didn't sound very good. It may have been the quality of the mp3 file, but all of my mp3's should be 128 kbps. But through the unit's speakers, it actually sounded great.

I also noticed that the unit finds songs from my computer alphabetically rather than by Track number. I'm not sure if I can change this or not, but I'd like to listen to an album in the correct order. This is probably something within the music server, but I'm just not sure yet.

Overall, the WMLS11B is awesome! It's fun to be able to stream my music anywhere in the house or even outside and also to be able to play internet radio stations from all over the world! Highly recommended, especially for the price!

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